Mark a Century of Women's Suffrage

One young woman has been chosen from every federal riding in Canada to represent their community and to communicate their vision for Canada.

Our invitation

Equal Voice has invited young women from the ages of 18 to 23 to be one of 338 who will take their seats in Parliament (from coast to coast to coast), literally. One young woman has been chosen from every federal riding in Canada to represent their community and to communicate their vision for Canada.

Our objective

Equal Voice's objective for our Daughters of the Vote initiative is to ensure these 338 emerging young women leaders, among others, become familiar with Canada’s political institutions and those women and men serving in them – so they are equipped and inspired to participate in the formal political sphere in the years and decades to come.

Our ultimate goal

Equal Voice's ultimate goal is to ensure women are dynamic and equal participants at every political decision making table in the country.

Join Equal Voice in a historic and ambitious initiative to mark the 100th anniversary of women’s formal federal political engagement — along with Canada’s 150th birthday in 2017.

In 1916, some women in three Canadian provinces (Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan) won the right to vote in provincial elections. In 1917, that same right was extended to a limited number of women in federal elections.

Following these partial victories, it would take another 45 years for the majority of women living in Canada (over the age of 18), including indigenous women living on federal reserves, to win the right to vote.

In 2015, 26 percent of Members of Parliament elected to the House of Commons were women. On average, women comprise 28 percent of elected officials in provincial and territorial legislatures. Only 18 percent of Canada's mayors are women. Clearly, the journey of women's full political participation, in all of their diversity, is far from complete.

Mi’gmaq beadwork by Natasha Martin

First Nations, Inuit and Metis Young Women

Equal Voice thanks the many Indigenous organizations and communities, who partnered with us to promote the Daughters of the Vote opportunity to First Nations, Inuit and Métis women. More than 200 applications were received from applicants of Indigenous heritage!

Latest updates

Seeking young women leaders in the Yukon

This year, 2017, marks the 100th anniversary of the first wave of Canadian women securing the right to vote in federal elections and the 50th anniversary of the election of the first woman to the Yukon Legislative Assembly. To commemorate this important milestone in Canada’s history and evolution as a democracy, in conjunction with the Commonwealth Women Parliamentarians Outreach Program, Equal Voice is hosting a Daughters of the Vote event at the Legislative Assembly of the Yukon....

Equal Voice and Abacus Data Release Canadian Opinions about Women in Politics

Majority of Canadians believe there are ‘too many’ or ‘the right number’ of women in politics; would not recommend a female they know run for public office.

ADVISORY: Equal Voice and Abacus Data Release Canadian Opinions about Women in Politics

Compelling and surprising research findings of a national survey about Canadians’ views and perceptions of women in politics will be released Monday, March 6th,  to launch  Equal Voice’s historic Daughters of the Vote (DOV) initiative and in recognition of the upcoming International Women’s Day. 

Equal Voice Announces Liz Plank as Featured Speaker for Daughters of the Vote

 “Millennial feminist voice” to Speak at International Women’s Day event in Ottawa  

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