Are you making a difference in your community?

Beadwork by Natasha Martin

Do you know any First Nations, Inuit and Metis youth (women aged 18-23) who show some leadership qualities, who want to make a difference in their community, and want to take part in the incredible opportunity?

Daughters of the Vote

  • All expenses paid trip to provincial and territorial events
  • All expenses paid trip to unceded Anishnaabe/Algonquin territory (Ottawa, Ontario, March 6-8, 2017)
  • A full day symposium for Indigenous youth across the country
  • Opportunities to build leadership skills
  • Learn how having a voice in politics can make a difference in your community
  • Opportunity to meet other youth from various multicultural background from across Canada

Deadline for application: June 30th, 2016

Join 338 young women on International Women's Day (March 7-8, 2017), from coast-to-coast-to-coast on unceded traditional Anishinaabe/Algonquin territory (Ottawa, Ontario) on Parliament Hill. Develop your leadership skills, meet other youth from across Turtle Island, and hear from outstanding women leaders from every sector, be a part of provincial/territorial events leading up to the national symposium.

We will welcome Indigenous youth a day earlier than our regular programming to be a part of a one day event in which you can meet with your peers, learn from each other, and participate in activities hosted by our community partners.

Come and have your voice heard!

Apply today for Daughters of the Vote and learn how the political process can empower and support you & your community

In advancing the goals of reconciliation and honouring Nation-to-Nation relationships, Daughters of the Vote is working in partnership with Aboriginal Organizations and communities.  We honour and respect the richness and great diversity of First Nations, Inuit and Métis across Turtle Island. 

We invite you to join us to strengthen and build your leadership skills, and further develop an understanding how your voice in this process can make a difference for other Indigenous youth, create meaningful change in your community.

More information please contact:

Melissa S. Greyeyes-Brant
First Nations, Inuit and Métis Outreach Coordinator 
melissa.sgb@equalvoice.ca

About the Design

Beadwork is a beautiful art form that has been passed down generation after generation by our grandmothers and continues to be used today by First Nations, Inuit and Métis. Having cultural and spiritual significance, it is an expression of identity. It can be a healing art form.

The three flowers in this design represent the three Indigenous groups: First Nations, Inuit and Métis. Connected together through the beaded vines, to each other, to the land. Yet each remaining distinct from each other, continually blossoming.

Brandon Mitchell

Brandon Mitchell is a Mi’gmaq from Listuguj Quebec. He is a writer, illustrator and graphic designer with over 15 years experience in the field.  After calling Ottawa home for 10 years, Brandon returned to the East Coast, currently residing in Fredericton, New Brunswick completing his Master in Education.  Most notable accomplishments are the creation of Sacred Circles, a graphic novel that put a modern twist on a local legend.  Most recently, Brandon worked on an international graphic novel project with the University of Alabama title “Jean-Paul’s Daring Adventure”.  He is married to Natasha Martin, they have two children Brayden and Bryce Mitchell.

For more samples of his work, visit: www.birchbarkcomics.com

Natasha Martin

Natasha Martin is Mi’gmaq from Listuguj Quebec. She is currently pursuing her Masters in Education at the University of New Brunswick. She is a women’s traditional dancer with 20 years experience on the pow wow trail.  Culture and heritage are important to her and she shares her knowledge and teachings with her children and community. Having created all of her sons’ regalia, this beadwork was part of her youngest, Bryce, regalia 6 years ago.